CIMT (Carotid Intima Media Thickness) Screening Event

The Prevent Clinic is hosting a CIMT Screening Event on February 20th, 2015 at our Sulphur Springs Location! Join us to learn more about your heart health and risk for heart attack or stroke.
127 Gilmer Street Sulphur Springs, TX 75482

Call us to set up an appointment!: 855-861-3820
Or e-mail us at: alison@apexprevent.com

A CIMT is:

  • Is painless and takes about 15 minutes
  • Can predict future cardiac (heart attack) and cerebrovascular (stroke) events
  • Allows earlier detection and intervention
  • Allows more accurate risk assessment than traditional risk factors, even in those with no symptoms
  • Can distinguish between different types of plaque providing further information about stable and unstable plaque
  • Is recommended once per year for everyone 40 years of age and older.
  • At baseline is recommend in younger people (under 40) with any concerns or risk factors such as family history, diabetes, high blood pressure.

CIMT Image

Surprisingly, you do not have to look directly at your heart to tell if you are at risk for a heart attack. Arterial disease (plaque build up or atherosclerosis in your artery walls) and inflammation are the underlying causes of most heart attacks and strokes. Unfortunately many people do not know they have plaque in their arteries until it is too late. You may have plaque and show no outward signs or symptoms of arterial disease.

The CIMT, one of the safest and best ways to check for plaque in your arteries is an ultrasound (sonogram) of the walls and inside lining of your carotid arteries – the major blood vessels in your neck. When these arteries become diseased with plaque, inflammation and formation of a blood clot can occur – which blocks blood flow to your brain and can result in a stroke. If this process is occurring in your heart (coronary) arteries, the result is a heart attack. The CIMT findings are reflective of the disease process throughout your body – thorough out your entire arterial system, including the heart (or coronary arteries). Abnormalities found on the CIMT are strongly linked to high risk for heart attack and stroke. In addition to plaque evaluation, the CIMT also provides an estimate of your arterial age. For this reason, the CIMT is sometimes referred to as the “Artery Age” test. If your arteries are significantly “older” than your chronological age, the wall are thicker than average for your age and gender. This is a sign you are developing cardiovascular disease.

Multiple studies indicate that CIMT measurement detects the presence or absence of atherosclerotic disease and also allows for assessment of the degree of atherosclerotic burden better than other noninvasive tests available. CIMT is recommended by both the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology.

Special pricing for 2/20/15 only-includes your report and an interpretation visit with Gina (phone or in person) available when you call or e-mail us!

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More About Eggs and Your Heart Health Plus A Recipe

Eggs and Heart HealthAs we discussed in my last blog, many people are afraid to eat cholesterol-containing foods, such as eggs.  Even though the egg yolk contains cholesterol, we recommend including eggs in your diet (unless you have an allergy, sensitivity, or reason not to eat eggs).

Egg yolks do contain upwards of 200mg of cholesterol, more than two-thirds of the American Heart Association’s recommended daily limit for cholesterol consumption.  But, eliminating cholesterol in one’s diet will not save you from a heart attack.  At The PREVENT Clinic, we do not base our methods solely on the  “lipid-hypothesis”.  We did so for years in our conventional Cardiology practice, and patients continued to have heart attacks and repeat stent procedures.  We know better now.

Cholesterol consumption is not to be ignored.  And one’s cholesterol numbers or the lipid profile (meaning your blood work – Total cholesterol, Triglycerides, HDL, LDL) are not to be ignored.  In fact, abnormalities in the lipid profile can be a major contributor to atherosclerosis and heart attack.  But strict avoidance of dietary cholesterol is not the answer.  Most of us handle the dietary cholesterol from eggs quite well.  Yes, eating too many fattening foods of all types is a problem.  But, eating eggs in moderation (2-3 per day) is unlikely to harm our heart or blood vessels.

So, enjoy your eggs!

Eggs from free range chickens are preferable to those from caged chickens.  Free range chickens generally have not been given antibiotics, hormones, and other chemicals.  And as compared to caged chicken eggs, free range chicken eggs contain:
1/3 less cholesterol
1/4 less saturated fat
2/3 more Vitamin A
2 times more Omega 3 fatty acids
3 times more Vitamin E
7 times more beta carotene

One of my favorite egg recipes: Muffin Tin Baked Eggs

I like to put two of these eggs in a zip lock bag for an “on the go” lunch or a snack. These eggs are also lovely served on a tray, garnished with parsley, chives, and cilantro and served with salsa and an assortment of fresh finely chopped vegetables or parmesan cheese to be used as toppings.

Ingredients:
Extra virgin olive oil
Sea salt or mineral salt
Pepper
Mrs. Dash or similar seasoning, as desired – optional
Eggs, preferably Free Range-may use 12 and fill the entire muffin tray-or only cook a few for the day-cook as many or as few as you need.
Chopped vegetables – optional

Pour small amount of extra virgin olive oil into each muffin cup.  Spread a thin layer of olive oil to cover bottom and sides of each muffin cup and wipe off excess.  Break one egg into each muffin cup.  Break the eggs into the cups carefully trying not to break the yolk.  Salt and pepper to taste.  You may also add a few chopped tomatoes, onions, peppers, spinach, or other vegetable to each egg, if desired.

Bake at 300 degrees for 10-15 minutes, depending on desired yolk consistency.  Do not bake in oven any hotter than 325 degrees, as the extra virgin olive oil is not good for you if taken to a high temperature.

Remove from the oven. Using a rubber spatula, loosen the edges of the egg and then slide spatula under the egg to pop it out of the muffin cup and onto your plate.

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Eggs and Your Heart Health

Cholesterol HealthRecently, I was asked about eggs and cardiovascular health.

Many people are afraid to eat cholesterol-containing foods, such as eggs. Eggs are a great source of vitamins, nutrients and amino acids. But, egg yolks contain cholesterol. What about eating cholesterol? Does cholesterol consumption increase one’s risk for atherosclerosis (plaque build up in the artery walls) and heart attacks? Do eggs clog arteries?

The ”lipid-hypothesis” theory suggests that there is a direct relationship between eating foods that are high in cholesterol (such as eggs, lobster, steak, and liver) and developing cardiovascular disease. This theory has long been controversial. Recent research suggests that dietary cholesterol isn’t nearly as dangerous as most people believe. Recent studies have demonstrated that eating three or more eggs per day raises HDL (the “good cholesterol”) and also produces larger HDL and LDL (the “bad cholesterol”) particles. Bigger more robust HDL particles are better at ridding the bloodstream of harmful cholesterol. And bigger LDL particles are less likely to invade the arterial wall and clump into plaque.

Cholesterol is important for every cell in our body, especially brain cells. We need cholesterol to make digestive bile acids that allow us to actually utilize nutrients from our food. Cholesterol is necessary to manufacturer sex hormones (testosterone, progesterone, and estrogen) and necessary to manufacturer vitamin D when exposed to sunlight. So, with the PREVENT method, we do not recommend strict restriction of dietary cholesterol for most people. Our genes influence cholesterol levels more than diet. So, it is important to know your genetic make-up for tailored nutritional recommendations that favor your DNA.

Part of this blog is paraphrased with permission from “Beat the Heart Attack Gene” written by Amy Doneen and Brad Bale, our current leading experts in heart attack and stroke prevention.  I highly recommend everyone read and follow the recommendations in this book.

Bale, Bradley, MD, Doneen, Amy, DNP, ARNP, Collier Cool, Lisa “Beat the Heart Attack Gene:  The Revolutionary Plan to Prevent Heart Disease, Stroke, and Diabetes” 2014  Wiley

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Reduce Stress so Life’s Not a Mess

We all know how stressful life can be. Between balancing home and work life, the increased congestion on our roads and the overall hectic schedule of our day to day lives can cause even the easiest going person to feel some stress. But how you let stress impact you is within your
control.

While a certain amount of stress is considered normal, stress that is frequent or long lasting can adversely affect your health, from headaches, to upset stomach, to weakening your immune system. Stress can also make your heart race and cause rapid breathing.

You CAN choose to have less stress in your life. I started thinking about the ways I control stress in my life, and here are my top 10: Continue reading “Reduce Stress so Life’s Not a Mess” »

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A Shake a Day to Keep Sickness at Bay

Shakes are a convenient and portable meal option – especially handy for breakfast on those busy mornings. Shakes are a great solution for getting healthy nutrition in our bodies even with a hectic schedule or busy lifestyle. In fact, a well-planned shake can be extremely beneficial for your body – a great way to pack in those nutrient-rich health-promoting and disease-fighting foods in a quick, easy, and delcious way. Shakes can be especially fun if you involve the kids.

Try this great Shake recipe I use often – one of my favorites! Continue reading “A Shake a Day to Keep Sickness at Bay” »

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Give Yourself the gift of Better Health this Christmas or Hanukkah Season!

I want to share with you a recent experience of mine…

As many of you know, I am working with the esteemed Cardiologist, Jeffrey Gladden, MD, FACC and the AWHOL-HP program.  AWHOL-HP is the acronym for Advanced Wellness Health Optimization & Longevity – Health Partners.  He and I “Walk the Talk”, as is recommended in the AWHOL-HP program I routinely have my blood drawn.  Most recently, on my second set of blood tests, my iron level had fallen from previous testing.

This was especially surprising to me because I have been eating healthier of recent – meaning Continue reading “Give Yourself the gift of Better Health this Christmas or Hanukkah Season!” »

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Do You Enjoy Your Healthcare?

This month I want to bring up a controversial and “HOT” topic:

Customer Satisfaction – meaning “Do you enjoy your health care”?
Or to word this question differently:

Do you at least get what you need when you go to the clinic, or go see the Doctor, the Nurse Practitioner, or the Physician Assistant (Health Care Provider or HCP)?

And do you enjoy the interaction or the experience?

It seems we have been Continue reading “Do You Enjoy Your Healthcare?” »

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Nothing To Fix

Have you or a loved one ever gotten the report of “Nothing to fix” following a Cardiac Catheterization?

This wording is often used to tell the person a coronary stent or balloon is not needed – that they have no coronary artery disease or only mild to moderate coronary artery disease. In this scenario, the recommendations may include medications or there may be no recommendations. But, the same wording –“Nothing to fix”-can describe coronary artery disease that either too extensive to benefit from a stent or balloon or is located such that a stent or balloon may not be possible (in a sharp angle or very small tortuous artery). Recommendations may include medications, coronary artery bypass surgery, or enhanced external counterpulsation (EECP). Continue reading “Nothing To Fix” »

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3 Things You Must Know for Your Heart’s Health

What more could I have done?” I am often asked this question by a patient in the hospital after a heart attack. The stories are similar: “I just had my annual physical and got a clean bill of health – good cholesterol numbers and passed my stress test. What more could I have done?

Today exciting research is coming out weekly demonstrating that there is indeed So Much More we can do to protect ourselves from heart attack and stroke. Cholesterol numbers (total cholesterol, total HDL or good cholesterol, total LDL or bad cholesterol, and triglycerides) and stress tests are most often not your best Continue reading “3 Things You Must Know for Your Heart’s Health” »

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View From The Cath Lab

One of the reasons I am passionate about what I do is that I will enable myself, my loved ones and many of you, my friends, to stay out of “The Cath Lab”.

Let me explain…
The Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory is succinctly referred to as “The Cath Lab”. This is the room or department in hospitals in which diagnostic and interventional procedures are performed. This room is much like an operating room although the procedures are specific to the heart and blood vessels.
Continue reading “View From The Cath Lab” »

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